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Expressive Creations

Expressive Creations

featuring

Mosiah Ware

Artist Bio

Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

© 2021 IACB

Mosiah Ware is a talented painter who specializes in mixed media artwork.  An enrolled member of the Delaware Nation of Oklahoma and a descendant of the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma, he is also a freelance artist and a full-time student at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma, majoring in graphic arts.  Mr. Ware resides in Anadarko, Oklahoma.

Raised in Anadarko, he was surrounded by many talented Indian artists who helped to spark his passion for art and significantly influenced his creative process.  While still in elementary school, Mr. Ware took an interest in drawing, beginning with stick figures and cartoons.  He drew on every scrap piece of paper he could find to practice his art.  

After graduating high school, Mosiah served six years in the United States Army.  During his service, he was stationed in various military bases and deployed for one year to Afghanistan.  Following his return to civilian life, he began exploring his artistic pursuits, driven by a desire to express himself creatively.  

His current artwork draws inspiration from Delaware and Kiowa histories and cultures, as well as contemporary issues in his community.  Conversation with family members can play a role in developing ideas for new artwork.   Inspiration also comes from studying other artwork, and adapting those elements into his own style and techniques.

When Mr. Ware is ready to begin a painting, he listens to music as a source of further inspiration.  The feelings generated by a significant song guide him as he converts his thoughts to notes and sketches on paper.  He then begins to transfer these ideas to a blank canvas, using oil or acrylic paints. 

Mr. Ware would like viewers of his art to be able to connect with his feeling at the time he makes each piece.  Mr. Ware is meticulous in the details of his work, occasionally spending as much as six months perfecting a painting.  As he gains more experience and skill as an artist, Mr. Ware’s art continues to change and develop in new and meaningful ways.  

Mr. Ware’s art has been exhibited at the Cameron University Art building in Lawton, Oklahoma, and is included in numerous private collections. This exhibit marks the first time his art has been exhibited in a professional museum setting and is Mr. Ware’s first solo exhibition.  The artwork featured in the exhibition may be purchased by contacting Mosiah Ware directly at chiefyellowhand285@gmail.com. 

Back roading image

Backroading to the Edge of the Planet
Acrylic on Linen canvas

 ©2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

In this painting, Mr. Ware uses various hues of primary and secondary colors to create a piece that represents vintage American art. He adds a Native American spin and brings a sense of euphoria to the futuristic style of the work. The process of creating this piece began by imagining a couple driving down a back road and finding a space of their own. Bright colors used in the foreground and mid ground are carried over into areas of the background to create an auroura effect in the sky. Radiant light from the planets and stars illuminate the couple driving the car. The shape of the couple forms a focal point that spreads outward into the negative space. 

 

image 2

Go My Son, Tribute to Robert Redbird Sr.

Acrylic on Linen Canvas

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

This painting was inspired by a 1983 piece made by renowned Kiowa Tribal artist, Robert Redbird The original piece was painted on paper using acrylic paints.

Mr. Ware's rendition is painted on linen canvas with oil paints which are meticulously applied in layers to create the same effect as the acrylic technique. He is pleased with the outcome of the painting and hopes viewers can see the connection to the original while appreciating his rendering.

 

image 3

Chief Kicking Bird

Acrylic on Linen Canvas

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

This colorful piece depicts Chief Kicking Bird of the Kiowa tribe in different hues, such as red, yellow, brown, white, gray, and black. The mid ground contains a dark-green surface with a silhouette of a buffalo and a dark-brown teepee to represent the plains Natives. The background features negative space from the top of the midground going up. Colors change from yellow, orange, red, violet, blue, and black with white lines and dots, representing a sunset. 

 

image 4

Protector of Our People

Graphite on Paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

The "Protector" stares off into the distance looking out for his people. This represents the guardian of the Native American people who was sent down by the Creator to watch out for all people. In the background, there is a ceremony being held by a family as they lay someone to rest.  They are returning the body back to Mother Earth and their spirit back to the heavens. The artist uses fine line work and a value scale of tones to create the Protector’s facial features, regalia, and war bonnet.

 

image 5

Lehman Ware Sr.

Acrylic on Canvas Board

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

"This artwork was painted in honor of my grandfather Lehman Ware Sr., also known as “Squirrel.”” His time in the Army served as a cornerstone in his life, bringing honor to his family.  The war bonnet on his head represents his status as a Native American Warrior. He was an inspiration to everyone around him; family, friends, and even strangers always took a liking to him. He loved his all his kids, grandkids, and wife. Thank you for everything, Grandpa."

Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

 

Image 6

Relefctions of a Mad Man

Acrylic Painting on Bristol Board

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

 
This artwork is an unorthodox self-portrait. The left side of the portrait features very limited colors: brown, black, white, and gray. The right side of the portrait features monochromatic values of gray and the red background is a striking color to capture the attention of the viewer. White and black jagged lines emerging from the center represent a mirror cracking and falling apart, a direct reference to someone trying to keep their mental health together. The left portion of the background represents depression and the right anxiety. This piece is dedicated to anyone fighting a battle within themselves. 

 

image 7

The Flood 3

Multimedia on paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware


 

This piece is Mr. Ware's representation the origin story for the Delaware Nation. 

The chief of the tribe experienced a vision from “The Creator” and set out to warn his people that a great flood was coming. He advised all the Delaware people to climb the mountain to safety. As they climbed the mountain, the waters rose higher and higher. Once they reached to highest point they could climb, the earth beneath them started to rumble and shake. As the shaking grew stronger, the earth rose before them, and a giant tortoise lifted them out of the water to safety. The tortoise remains an important symbol to the Delaware Nation.  

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Searching Planet Caravan

Graphite on Paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

 

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Searching Planet Caravan 2

Graphite on Paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

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Searching Planet Caravan 3

Graphite on Paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

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Morning Star

Acrylic on Canvas

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

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Searching Planet Caravan

Graphite on Paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

 

Searching Planet Caravan 2

Graphite on Paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

Searching Planet Caravan 3

Graphite on Paper

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware

Morning Star

Acrylic on Canvas

© 2021 Mosiah Yellowhand Ware